Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Super Green List

Posted on


Connecting Human and Ocean Health

Seafood plays an important role in a balanced diet. It’s often rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which help boost immunity and reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer and other ailments. Omega-3s are especially important for pregnant and nursing women, and young children. Unfortunately, some fish carry toxins that can become harmful when eaten frequently.

Good for You, Good for the Oceans

Combining the work of conservation and public health organizations, the Monterey Bay Aquarium has identified seafood that is “Super Green,” meaning that it is good for human health and does not harm the oceans. The Super Green list highlights products that are currently on the Seafood Watch “Best Choices” (green) list, are low in environmental contaminants and are good sources of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids.

This effort draws from experts in human health, notably scientists from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Environmental Defense Fund (EDF). The Monterey Bay Aquarium will continue to work with these organizations to balance the health and environmental attributes of seafood.

The Super Green list includes seafood that meets the following three criteria:

  • Low levels of contaminants (below 216 parts per billion [ppb] mercury and 11 ppb PCBs)
  • The daily minimum of omega-3s (at least 250 milligrams per day [mg/d])*
  • Classified as a Seafood Watch “Best Choice” (green)

  • The Best of the Best: September 2010

    • Albacore Tuna (troll- or pole-caught, from the U.S. or British Columbia)
    • Freshwater Coho Salmon (farmed in tank systems, from the U.S.)
    • Oysters (farmed)
    • Pacific Sardines (wild-caught)
    • Pink Shrimp (wild-caught, from Oregon)
    • Rainbow Trout (farmed)
    • Salmon (wild-caught, from Alaska)
    • Spot Prawns (wild-caught, from British Columbia)

    ** Other Healthy “Best Choices”

    • Arctic Char (farmed)
    • Barramundi (farmed, from the U.S.)
    • Dungeness Crab (wild-caught, from California, Oregon or Washington)
    • Longfin Squid (wild-caught, from the U.S. Atlantic)
    • Mussels (farmed)

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s